Mississippi

Part 2: Yvonne Bivins on the History of Rachel Knight

RACHEL KNIGHT

BY

SONDRA YVONNE BIVINS

Rachel Knight was about sixteen years old when John “Jackie” Knight of Covington County, MS, came into possession of her in the spring of 1856.  Rachel was born on March 14, 1840 in Macon, GA.  Mormon Missionary records show that her parents were named Abraham and Viney.  That is all we know of her past life.  At about the time Rachel arrived on Jackie Knight’s place his brother, James Knight, moved from Monroe County to Bibb County to live with his son, Thomas.  It is quite possible that Rachel was first owned by James Knight.  One of the constant threats that slaves faced was the danger of being sold away from family.  By the time Rachel was fifteen years old, she had two children, Rosetta and George Ann. The fact that George Ann was nearly white possibly caused some dissention in Georgia, and may be the reason Rachel and her girls were sold.  I have no proof that this was the case; however, I do know that historically, a white slave child born on a plantation caused friction in the family of the owner.  Ironically, the white mistress typically blamed the slave woman for her husband’s indiscretion; thus, the vixen described in Echo of the Black Horn was born.

My grandfather, Warren Smith, described Rachel as a “Guinea Negro,” meaning she was racially mixed but did not look white, nor was she light-skinned, but had “nice hair”–not kinky and shoulder length. To get an idea of how Rachel must have looked, I began to prod my mother to tell me exactly what my grandfather said about Rachel. According to my mother, he said that she looked like another woman who had lived in our community when she was growing up. This woman was short in stature, had a dark brown complexion and long thick coarse black hair that was not kinky. Hearing this, I realized that Rachel undoubtedly looked very much like her daughter, Martha Ann Knight who, in my opinion, could easily pass for an Australian Aborigine.

Martha Ann Knight, daughter of Rachel Knight and probably Newt Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

Martha Ann Knight, daughter of Rachel Knight and probably Newt Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

Shortly after Rachel arrived on John Knight’s plantation, his son, Jesse Davis, began a sexual relationship with her.  His relationship with Rachel resulted in the birth of Jeffrey Early on March 15, 1858. Given the tenuousness of her condition, it is doubtful that Rachel would have seduced Jesse.  She already knew what happened when a slave woman gave birth a “white child,” because it had happened to her before; she was sold.  In John Jackie Knight’s will, dated September 4, 1860, he willed Rachel and Jeffrey to Jesse Davis.  The will reads as follows:

“…and to my son, Jesse D. Knight I do will and bequeath a certain Negro woman named Rachel and Jeffrey, her child with her increase, if any, on his paying to each of the heirs of my son, Benjamin Knight, deceased.”

The estate was auctioned on March 20, 1861 almost a year before shots were fired at Ft. Sumter, SC.  After Jesse came into possession of Rachel, Edward was born on February 8, 1861 and then Fanny was born March 18, 1863.  Now mind you, Jesse had a wife and ten children with the last born in January 1863.

Jesse Davis was mustered in the 27th Mississippi Infantry of the Confederate States of America in November or December 1861. In December 1863, Jesse Davis contracted measles during the Battle of Atlanta and died of pneumonia. He was buried in the Civil War Cemetery in Atlanta, GA.

Newt’s relationship with Rachel began toward the end of the Civil War when it is believed she helped him and his band of deserters and marauders evade capture during his raids on supply trains. Rachel was very superstitious and practiced using herbs for healing and warding off wild animals and such.

During the five years after the War Newton’s and Rachel’s relationship was firmly established. Newt set Rachel and her children up in a house next door to his family and brought them up as white. Unlike most whites in the Piney Woods who were keeping “open secrets,” he did not hide his relationships with Rachel and her daughter George Ann. This was taboo and disturbing to local residents both white and black. Newt’s reputation for punishing anyone who crossed him kept anyone from attempting to harass his family.  Before he died in 1922, he had become a living legend and the centerpiece of the legend of the Free State of Jones.

According to census records, on July 14, 1870, Rachel and her children lived next door to Newt and Serena in the Southwest Beat of Jasper County. Rachel was described as a black female, age 30, born in Georgia. In her house were six children: George Ann, a mulatto female, age 17; Jefferson (Jeffery), a mulatto male, age 15; Edmond, a mulatto male, age 13; Fancy (Fan), a mulatto female, age 11; Marsha (Martha), a mulatto female, age 9; and Stuart, a mulatto male, age 7. Newton ran his home in a harem-like fashion having simultaneous relationships with Serena, his wife, Rachel, and George Ann, Rachel’s daughter. During the early 1870s, George Ann gave birth to two children that many believe were fathered by Newton: John Howard, born August 1871, and Rachel Anna, born March 1874.  However, Cleo Garraway, Howard’s granddaughter, said that she never heard anyone say that Newt was the father of her grandfather, Howard, or her Aunt Anna. After Rachel’s death in 1889, Gracie was born in November 1891 and Lessie was born in May 1894. Cleo was so ashamed of the circumstances of her birth, she did not care to know from whom she was descended.

Cleo Knight Garraway, daughter of John Howard Knight, son of George Ann Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

Cleo Knight Garraway, daughter of John Howard Knight, the only son of George Ann Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

As soon as Rachel’s children and grandchildren were old enough to marry, Newt encouraged them to marry whites or at least someone nearly white.  According to information I have gleaned from family stories, he wanted to erase that “one drop” of Negro blood in their veins.  Many whites believe or want to believe that Newt forced his two older children to marry Rachel’s Jeffrey and Fan as claimed in Echo of the Black Horn, but family history says “not so.” Contrary to popular belief, Rachel’s children coexisted in relative harmony with their white kin and neighbors, including Tom.

While having children with Rachel, the domineering, larger-than-life Newton continued to have children with his wife, Serena Turner, whose last child was born in 1875.  Indeed, Serena was the quintessentially dutiful southern wife, dependent on her husband and silently suffering the personal degradation of Newt’s relationships with Rachel and George Ann.  The 1910 census shows her living in the home of her daughter, Mollie.  Was she simply tired of living with Newt, or was she so old and infirm that she had to move in with the daughter for care?

Serena Knight in old age. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

Serena Knight in old age. Collection of Yvonne Bivins.

In June, 1880, Rachel Knight and her children still lived next door to Newton and Serena.  On the census, she is described as a black female, age 40 (prior to June 1), born in Georgia.  Her parents are listed as born in Virginia.  Living in the household were George Ann, a mulatto female, age 26; Jeffrey, a mulatto male, age 22; Martha Ann, a mulatto female, age 15; John S[teward], a mulatto male, age 12; John Floyd, a mulatto male age 10; and Augusta Ann, a mulatto female, age 7.  This census contains several mistakes; e.g. Jeff Knight is listed two houses down from Rachel at dwelling 105 and also included in Rachel’s house at dwelling 107.  George Ann is also listed twice, first as daughter then as granddaughter.  George Ann’s household included herself, a mulatto female, age 26 (erroneously identified as Rachel’s granddaughter); John H[oward], a mulatto male, age 9 (grandson); and Rachel (Anna), a mulatto female, age 6 (granddaughter).

George Ann Knight, daughter of Rachel Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins

George Ann Knight, daughter of Rachel Knight. Collection of Yvonne Bivins

The Mormon Church began proselytizing throughout the South and in particular Jones County in the early 1880’s.  Rachel, along with Fan and her family, was convinced to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. According to Knight researcher Kenneth Welch, Rachel traveled out to Utah but came back to Mississippi because it was too cold.

At Rachel’s place, located near Newt’s, family members worked very hard but made a good living on the self-sufficient farm, They earned money to pay for things like coffee, sugar and goods like shoes and dishes. They raised cows for milk and butter; raised chickens and sold eggs; planted fields and sold the produce; canned vegetables from a small garden, and even made their clothes.  Life was hard; they lived on a farm in an isolated community located near the Jasper-Jones county line.

In February, 1889, Rachel died; she was only 49 years old.  She did not leave a will but left about 180 acres of farm land for her children. According to family members, she died from having too many babies too close together.  A child was born to her every two years beginning at the age of fourteen. In 1914, Rachel’s children filed a lawsuit against J. R. McPherson in order to keep their land inheritance.

Yvonne Bivins

click here for part three!

29 replies »

  1. Yvonne, I am very happy to see your story of the Knights. You have done a lot of research and we will all be better people of that. I have a picture of Augusta Ann Knight (daughter of Newt and Rachel) posted on my tree Southern Bred Families if you would like to include it with yours. It was given to me by her granddaughter. Augusta married a black man and caught a lot of flack from her family for doing so. Can’t wait to read part 3. One of Valentine cousins and I are going back through our family notes to find out more about Lacey Knight—will let you know what we find. Keep up the great work! Love ya cousin.

    Yvonne knows this but I am the GGGGranddaughter of Sampson Jefferson Ainsworth, the GGranddaughter of Levi Valentine, the GGrandaughter of Morris Watson Kervin, Jr., and the GGGranddaughter of James Richard Welch.

  2. Ann,
    Thanks for this very interesting post. You have an interesting family tree, bringing together the Ainsworths with three family names closely associated with the Knight band.

    Vikki

  3. Vikki,

    You don’t know the half of it! The families of Jones, Smith, and Jasper Counties were all very intertwined during the 1800′s and early 1900″s. Most were either blood related or related by the marriage of a family member. I have been able to connect quite a number of family names together.

    Ann Valentine

    • Vicki said you might have some information about my grandmother; Mary Viola Dolly Landrum, she is said to have been cherokee and was married to my grandfather Morris Watson Kervin Jr. My Dad was one of their last children & is deceased. I am trying to find out who Dolly’s parents were. If you can help please e mail.

      Jimmy Doyle Kervin

  4. YVONNE! THE MORE I READ, THE MORE EXCITED I BECOME.
    THE ONLY THING IS, I STILL HAVE NOT READ ABOUT ANDY KNIGHT, MY GREAT-GRANDFATHER, WHO STARTED THE MOUNT PLEASANT MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH IN SOSO, MS. THERE ARE TWO CHURCHES ON THE SAME ROAD AND BOTH ARE STILL ACTIVE. ONE IS A SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIS CHURCH AND THE OTHER ONE IS A BAPTIST CHURCH (MOUNT PLEASANT). WAS HE REALLY DAN KNIGHT’S FATHER? HE ALSO HAD SEVERAL OTHER CHILDREN. ROBERT, ELL, LUTHER, CLARENCE AND SEVERAL DAUGHTERS I CANNOT RECALL. CAN YOU SHED MORE LIGHT ON THIS SUBJECT?

    • I just ran across your request for information about Andy Knight. You may already have this information by now, if you do have it, just delete this email. Andy father’s name was Daniel T. Knight. Andy also named one of his sons Daniel (see 1900 Census).

      According to the Census from 1870–1910, Harriet had 16 known children. In the 1870 Census they were enumerated with Harriet’s mother, Phillis Carter, hence all of their last names were listed as Carter. The names in parenthesis are known last names that were used by her children. They were listed as follows:

      1870 Census (Jones County, MS record for Phillis Carter, page 14 of 28, line #1)

      Claiborne (Graves) abt.1859
      Isaac abt.1860
      Andy (Knight) abt.1861
      Lewis abt 1863
      Jackson abt.1864
      Joseph (Broomfield) abt.1865,
      Samuel (Knight) abt.1867

      In the 1880 Census, they were again enumerated with Harriet’s mother, but her last name has changed from Carter to Knight and everyone in her household were listed as Knight’s. Isaac and Samuel were not listed under Phillis household in 1880. They were listed as follows:

      1880 Census (Jones County, MS record for Fillis Knight, page 12 of 26, line #1)

      Clabe (Graves) abt.1859
      Jackson abt.1864
      Lewis abt 1863
      Andy (Knight) abt.1861
      Joseph (Broomfield) abt.1865,
      Joan (Knight) abt. 1880
      Mary (Knight) abt. 1884
      Emeline (Knight) abt. 1886
      Bell (Ward) abt. 1878

      The 1900 Census shows Harriet had married Ike Ward. Their household consisted of the following children:

      1900 Census (Jones County, MS record for Ike Ward, page 32 of 53, line #61)

      Bell Ward Oct 1878
      Frank Ward Jul 1884
      Hattie Apr 1886
      Jessie May 1888
      Phillis Aug 1889
      Nellie Jane Jul 1891
      Barnes, William May 1880 (Ike & Harriet’s Grandson)

      1910 Census (Jones County, MS record for Ike & Harriette Ward, page 49 of 52, line #22)

      Jessie May 1888
      Phillis Aug 1889
      Nellie Jane Jul 1891
      John Knight abt. 1891 (Ike & Harriet’s Grandson)
      Tim Knight abt. 1892 (Ike & Harriet’s Grandson)

      My GGF, Joseph S. Broomfield, was the brother to your GGF, Andy Knight. Not only did Harriet’s off springs play an important role in establishing Mount Pleasant Church, some of them (Luther & Viola Knight) donated land for the building of the Seventh Day Adventist Church and the M.T.P. and S.D.A. Cemetery where Rachel Ann Knight established her school in Soso.

      Harriet’s off springs of Soso village also obtained land grants from the federal government and brought the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge to Soso, MS. The lodge, located in the right rear of Mount Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church, still flourishes today. Rev. Percy Moore was pastor at the church in December 1985 when I recorded the following information from a plaque to the entrance of the lodge:

      MT. Lebanon Lodge No. 269
      Organized 1902 Joe Broomfield W.M.
      R.B. 1962 R. Mc Cullen W.M.
      John Knight S.W.
      A.D. Shelby J.W.
      C. Knight Sect.
      J.W. Ward T.Y.
      Other Shelby Treas.
      John Keys Com.
      S. Buckley Com.

      It seems to me that these people enjoyed their freedom and prospered after slavery and the beyond the reconstruction period to became self reliant which is a far cry from where we as a people are today.

      I have many documents about Harriet’s descendents and photos of many of their headstones for those who are buried in M.T.P./S.D.A. Cemetery and the Mount Vernon Church Cemetery where Harriet & Ike are buried. Does anyone know if there is any significant to having the shed over Harriet’s grave? The reason I am asking is because it is slowly falling apart and I would like to replace it (with family approval) with a metallic shed that can stand the elements a little better.

      Finally, I am all about inclusion and I totally agree with Yvonne about getting over the obstacles, imagined or real.

  5. This family is very complicated and sorting out who fathered each of Harriet’s children is a task in the works. When I think that I have it all worked out, I find something new. As I said, you might go to Ancestry.com and look at the Rachel Knight and Harriet Carter Ward family tree. You can sign up for a 14-day free trial. You can get my personal email through Dr. Bynum. BTW, the Adventist Church was founded by the descendants of Newton Knight and the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church was founded by the descendants of Harriet Carter Ward. They have two separated family reunions.

  6. JUST WONDERING IF YOU HAVE ANY INFO ON THE CHILDREN OF SUSAN SMITH AND JEFFREY KNIGHT?
    I KNOW I HAVE A CONNECTION WITH NEWT KNIGHT,
    I’M JUST HAVING TROUBLE RUNNING IT DOWN. MY GRANDFATHER WAS WEBSTER NEWTON WELBORN. HE NEVER ALLOWED ANY ONE IN HIS FAMILY TO SPEAK OF NEWTON KNIGHT. MY FATHER HAS ALSO PASSED AWAY AND I NEVER KNEW ANYTHING ABOUT THIS UNTIL HE HAD PASSED AWAY. I REALLY DON’T HAVE ANYONE TO ASK THAT KNOWS ANY DETAILS. THOUGHT YOU MAY HAVE SOME INFO SINCE YOU HAVE DONE SUCH EXTENSIVE RESEARCH. THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

    • Hello Cathy,

      I just checked my records, and found Webster Newton Welborn listed as the son of Ulysses Grant Welborn, who married Susan A. Knight, the daughter of Newt and Serena Knight. That would make him from a different branch of the Knight family than that of Jeffrey and Susan Ella Smith Knight.

      Ulysses Grant Welborn (b. about 1865) was the grandson (through Caroline Welborn, b. about 1848) of Younger Welborn Sr. (b. 1805), a member of the Unionist branch of the Welborn family, as evidenced by his grandson’s name.

      You mention that your grandfather, Webster Newton Welborn, would not allow Newt Knight’s name to be spoken. I suspect that was because by the 20th century it was not generally acceptable for a southerner to have supported the Union rather than the Confederacy. There was also the matter of Newt’s multiracial family; many branches of the Knight family disavowed any connection with him because of the issue of race.

      Vikki

  7. Although it is a work in progress, I do have most of them posted my ancestry.com family tree. My mother recently passed away, so my source is gone. I am glad to share what I have. The family tree can be found under Smith-Ainsworth Family on the ancestry site.

  8. IS IT POSSIBLE TO VIEW THIS TREE OR DO I HAVE TO BE A MEMBER? MOLLIE’S DEATH IS LISTED AS 1817 IN PART 3 BUT CHILDREN ARE SHOWN TO BE BORN TO JEFFREY AND MOLLIE AS LATE AS 1900. IS THIS A TYPO? THE ONLY THING I WAS EVER TOLD ABOUT MY GRANDFATHER’S MOTHER WAS HER NAME, IT WAS SUSAN. BUT I HAVE TO WONDER IF IT COULD HAVE BEEN MOLLIE SINCE MY G’FATHER’S DATE OF BIRTH IS 1890 OR DID SUSAN HAVE CHILDREN WHEN SHE MARRIED JEFFREY? AGAIN THANKS FOR YOUR TIME.

  9. THANKS FOR THE INFO, I NEVER KNEW THE NAME OF MY G’FATHER’S FATHER. I WAS JUST TOLD HIS MOTHER WAS SUSAN, SO WHEN I READ THAT JEFFREY MARRIED SUSAN SMITH I JUST ASSUMED. SO NEWT KNIGHT WOULD BE MY GGGRANDFATHER OR AM I CONFUSED?

  10. Cathy,

    Yes, Newt Knight is your GGGrandfather. You are descended from Susan, the younger sister of Molly, and NOT from Jeffrey and Jeffrey’s second wife, Susan Ella Smith. If you visit the family histories section of Ancestry.com and type in your grandfather’s name, you will find several family trees that list Webster Newton Welborn’s parents as Susan A. Knight and Ulysses Grant Welborn.

    You have an interesting family tree–connected on both sides to the Unionist band, the Knight Company, headed by Newt Knight. Check out the Newt Knight roster of 1870 on this blog and you will find several of your Welborn kinfolk listed.

    Vikki

  11. There is mention of my grandfather, Morris Watson Kervin Jr in this article. If you have any information about him or my grandmother, Mary Viola “Dolly” Landrum aka Kervin, could you please let me know. I know they are both buried in Bethel Baptist cemetary in Coventry county. Ther is speculation she was Cherokee but have no proof as my father has passed away and was only 2 yrs old when Dolly died. He apparently was raised by older sisters.

  12. JIm,

    While the article itself does not mention Morris Watson Kervin, Jr., in the first comment following, Ann Valentine identifies him as her great-grandfather. Perhaps, then, Ann has information that may shed light on him or his wife, Dolly Landrum.

    Also, Please notice that Morris Watson Kervin is listed on Newt Knight’s 1870 roster of men as “M.W. Kurven” (click http://renegadesouth.wordpress.com/2009/01/17/1870-knight-company-roster/ to view).

    Hope you get some answers.

    Vikki

    p.s. I assume by “Coventry County,” you meant Covington County.

  13. I know that my grandfather James C. Morren, was born to John Wesley Morren and Elizabeth Lizzie Knight, born 1856. I believe from census records and family tree websites I have found Elizabeth’s parents, James Knight and Judy V. Welch. James was born July 1831, died August 6, 1865. Judy was born March 8, 1832 in Jones County. She died October 16, 1916. They also had a son James David Knight, born April 13, 1861. Would you know what relationship they have to Newt? I know that we are related because my grandmother was upset when my cousin married Ethel Knight’s nephew, she didn’t like it because the families were related. I just don’t know how. My mom is 93 and bless her heart she just can’t remember. Thanks

  14. Alice,

    Yes, it would appear that both you and Ethel Knight are descended from James Knight and his wife, Juda V. Welch. James Knight, who died as a result of Civil War wounds, was a grandson of John “Jackie” Knight and Keziah Davis Knight. His parents were Albert Knight Sr. and Mason Rainey Knight. James was the older brother of Newt Knight. He and Juda’s children were therefore first cousins to Newt.

    Ethel’s line from James Knight is through his and Juda’s daughter, Sarah (Sally), who married Robert Boykin. Their son, James Alexander Boykin, married Sarah Graves. Ethel Boykin, who later married Sidney Champenois Knight, was their daughter.

    I hope this fully answers your question.

    Thanks,
    Vikki

    • Hi Vikki,

      My Grand mother was Corrine Ainsworth and lived in Taylorsville, MS and her sisters Ruby and Daisy and she had a brother named Rill (not sure of spelling) I looked at the Coon Ainsworth tree and it looks like we would fit in there some how but i do not see any family names that are familiar. I understand it to be that my GM had relations with a Blakeney that was married and had children and i also have heard that we cross the Black and possibly the Choctaw. Daisy married Claude Robinson and my Aunt had a boutiqe called 5-K’s in Taylorsville. No one will ever break their scilence on this. Please help;
      James Hamilton——–jamesglbsd@yahoo.com

      • Here is Yvonne Bivins’s reply to James Hamilton’s question, which she sent directly to me and gave me permission to post:

        Hello, Vikki,

        Corinne Ainsworth was the daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte Ainsworth (not to be confused with Napoleon B. Ainsworth listed on the Dawes Roll and Choctaw Leader). Napoleon B Ainsworth was born in Smith County, MS in Jun 1874 to Jefferson “Jesse” Napoleon Ainsworth and Sophia Tillson. Jesse’s father was Sampson Jefferson “Jeff” Ainsworth who was the father of my great grandmother Martha’s children: Charity (Shelby), Annie (Heidelberg), Lewis, Susan (Shelby), Lucy (Smith/Knight) and Josephine (died in infancy).

        Sampson Jefferson’s father was Thomas/Tom Ainsworth born in the Cheraw District, SC. His wife, Sarah Finch, is believed to be descended from Native American tribe in SC. In 1815, it appears that Thomas moved his family to the Mississippi Territory shortly after his discharge from service. Records show that he paid a poll tax in Wayne County, MS Territory. It is believed that he went off to live with the Choctaw after he arrived in Mississippi taking the name of Philamahaya. His name shows up again in Smith County, MS on the 1840 Census.

        Jesse Napoleon was the father of a mulatto child born to his servant, Caroline Duckworth Buckhalter. The child’s name was Andrew Buckhalter.

      • My Grandmother Lois (Ainsworth) Zoder was the sister to Corrine, Daisy, and others i can remember. I know they had brothers, Carl, Roy and a few others.

    • My grandmother’s father was James David Knight (13 Ap 1861 to 17 Aug 1953) . His parents were James (Jim) W. Knight b. 1831 and Juda (Judy) Welch, b. 1832.
      My mother used to tell us a story about James David Knight her matural grandfather. As an old man, he was sitting on his front porch. Someone came down the street shouting that a mad dog was on the loose and he should go inside. Grandpa Knight replied ” My father was a Knight and my mother was a Welch, I ain’t afraid of no mad dog.”

      From that I gather that at least some Knight descendants were proud to be “renegades”.

  15. Hello ms. Bivins, My name is Ronnie White. I am the gson of John Henry Knight. My mother, Annie R. Knight is his daughter. She is the niece of Clarence, Andy, Amos, Ell and their brothers. No one knows, but can you tell me who John’s father was? Also, is there any info on Harriet Ward and her husband Ike Ward? I know the family is a confusing one with both of the black and white Knight’s. Where and from whom did the Knight family come to be? How did we get our name. If you have any info at all, I would greatly appreciate all that you have. How does the name Newt Knight come into play? You can contact me@1retmar@cox.net. Thank you

  16. Dear vikki,I am somewhat of aJones Count historian. My folks came to Laurel from Michigan to help run the sawmills. my favorite story is what Gardiner Green said about the monument at the laurel courthouse .he had donated lots of money for it. ”Isn’t that something a confederate monument in a county that seceded from the Union built with yankee money”. Ha HA HA Allow me to put in a plug for my sister’s book ”meadow Woods The Beackoning ” by Marcelle Bartran Harwell It is about aplantation family in Miss. Thanks , RObert Bartran

  17. Hello Yvonne,

    Thank you and Mr. Lewis for the family tree information you provided on Harriet Ward Carter and her son Andy Knight. It was very informative. However, of all Great Grandfather’s Andy Knight’s children, a cloud of mystery still hovers over Robert “Bob” Knight. He married Melvina Knight and together they had eighteen (18) or more children. Is there anyone anywhere who has a photo of Robert “Bob” Knight that is in good condition? I have very old uncles and aunts who would be most appreciative if one could be located.

    Thanks
    Dale

  18. Dale,

    The question you asked about “anyone anywhere who has a photo of Robert “Bob” Knight that is in good condition?” might be better answered amongst family members at the family reunion in Soso on 8-10 Jul 11. I am sure that someone there, especially his descendants, will have a photo or know where to obtain one of him.

    You also mentioned that Bob and Melvina had 18 children, I can only account for nine (Lanzie, Charlie, Davis, John Lavada, Curtis, Clarence II, Mary L and Udell M), but other family members might know of other children which is another good reason to attend the family reunion in July. I remember meeting two of them Udell and John Knight. Udell is also the father to Janice Knight who is married to my nephew, Dennis Beaver. John and his wife Regina “Redd” had 12 children (Lavern, Aniece, Robbie, Hertisene, Earl, Billy, Deavours, Floristine, Anthony Paul, Orlando, Johnetta and Otis) that I can account for. I remember back in December 1974, upon my return from Germany, John assisted me with installing a gas tank on my car that I had left at my mother’s house in Soso so that my relatives in Houston would not abuse the car (that’s another story) while I was away oversea for two years.

    In my previous reply to you, I made three mistakes on the year of birth for Joan, Mary and Emeline. The correct years are shown below:

    1880 Census (Jones County, MS record for Fillis Knight, page 12 of 26, line #1)
    Clabe (Graves) abt.1859
    Jackson abt.1864
    Lewis abt 1863
    Andy (Knight) abt.1861
    Joseph (Broomfield) abt.1865,
    Joan (Knight) abt. 1870
    Mary (Knight) abt. 1874
    Emeline (Knight) abt. 1876
    Bell (Ward) abt. 1878

    If you look under my name on Ancestry.com, yesterday I posted a pamphlet on Mount Pleasant MB Church. You might find some information on your ancestors from the many pictures shown.

    If you send me your personal email address, I can forward the family reunion flyer and a few other bits of information on the family. Let’s hope that at the family reunion we can collective shed more light on Robert Knight and our other ancestors.

  19. Does anyone have any information on a Ned Moore around the Port Gibson, MS area, or anything on the Killian family around that same area.

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